Research

Information on all requests for research

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From time to time, Dyslexia Scotland receives requests for research participants. Details of all research requests will be posted here with a synopsis of the research findings, where possible. 
Unless indicated, please note that Dyslexia Scotland is not associated in any way to the research requests on this page. 
If you are interested in taking part in any of the research listed, please use the contact details provided.  For any other information, please email:info@dyslexiascotland.org.uk

Research on Dyslexia for Art Exhibition

Responses to this survey by artist Lucy Grainge will inform an upcoming art exhibition in Leith. Link to Survey here

 

Autonomy, Rights and Children with Additional Support Needs

The aim of this research is to examine how children’s rights are being promoted in the area of special and additional support needs.  The research is being conducted by two teams, one based at the University of Edinburgh and one at the University of Manchester. 

Parents and carers of children and young people with additional support needs have for some time had a right to have a say in their child’s education.  There has been an increasing emphasis on ensuring that the views of children and young people with special and additional support needs are reflected in important decisions relating to their education. This research aims to explore the extent to which children and young people are being given opportunities to participate in everyday decisions about their education and also in disagreement resolution processes. The research will provide information on:

  1. The strategies used by schools and local authorities to engage children and young people in educational decision-making;
  2. Children’s and young people’s views on their involvement in decision-making relating to their education;

  3. Parents/carers’ views on the extent to which their children are active participants in the decision-making process;

  4. Factors which promote or inhibit the ability of children’s and young people’s views to be heard and taken into account.

For further information about the project contact: Professor Sheila Riddell, e-mail: Sheila.Riddell@ed.ac.uk; phone: 0131 651 6597 

To see the questionnaire, click here.

Study into the use of social media amongst parents of children with hidden disabilities

Participants needed to help look at the use of social media as a coping strategy.  Click here to take part.  

 

Call for dyslexia research participants: adults, both with and without dyslexia

Researchers at the University of Trento (Italy) are studying the perception of webpage visual complexity by people with dyslexia versus average readers. The research aims to improve the next generation of Web accessibility guidelines, particularly focusing on the legibility of the Web for dyslexic people.

The researchers are now looking for participants for a brief online study. Both dyslexic and average readers are needed. The study includes viewing webpages and rating how complex they seemed. The webpages will very briefly be flashed on the screen. The study should take less than 15 minutes.

If you would like to participate in the research, please follow the link: http://dyslexia.atw-lab.com/welcome/adult/en/web/

Note: the study does not run from a mobile device because it needs a larger monitor.

Email for research-related requests: miniukovich@disi.unitn.it

 

Dyslexia tutors and assessors required to trial new software that builds confidence and productivity for dyslexic writers

SprintPlus, is a relatively new piece of software that students and adults use to proof their written work either at school, university or work. We would like to invite dyslexia assessors or tutors from all areas to trial SprintPlus.  In return for your feedback we will give you a free license.

We believe that SprintPlus builds the confidence and productivity of dyslexic writers but we want your thoughts and comments.

For more information, please take a look at our demo video at www.sprintplus.co.uk and if you would like to take part simply indicate your interest by email to John Hicks at john.hicks@jabbla.com.

 

New research on visual issues

Teams from Bristol and Newcastle universities carried out eye tests on more than 5,800 children and did not find any differences in the vision of those with dyslexia. Report co-author Alexandra Creavin said eyesight was "very unlikely" to be the cause of such reading problems. The study draws on a long-term tracking study in the Bristol area, which has followed the health of more than 14,000 children since the 1990s.Click here to find out more.

Click here for a statement on the research and the BBC article by the International Institute of Colorimetry. 

Click here for Dyslexia Scotland's leaflet on Visual Issues.